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New review: Eden in the East, by Stephen Oppenheimer

There are many intriguing similarities among the mythologies of people in different parts of the world, often widely separated from one another. This is particularly true of stories of great floods; the Biblical account of a flood is merely one of many similar accounts. Such resemblances could perhaps be due to chance, but for much of the last century psychological theories were the most popular. C.G. Jung in particular advocated the view that common features in the psychology of humans were responsible for the tendency to produce similar myths. [More[

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