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Book review: Mystery of Mysteries, by Michael Ruse

Michael Ruse has written extensively on the history and background of evolutionism, which he is well qualified to do, being, somewhat unusually, a professor of both philosophy and zoology. In this book it is mainly the philosophy of science that he is concerned with. He wishes to explore the question of how far science can be regarded as a cultural product rather than an objective quest for truth.


What is the true nature of science? Is it objective? Is it, as Karl Popper said, "knowledge without a knower"? Something which tells us about the real world out there? Or is it subjective, as Thomas Kuhn and those following him have suggested? Is science a reflection or epiphenomenon of culture? Something which changes as science changes and which tells us less about reality and more about ourselves? Is science a social construction? Is evolution a social construction?
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