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Evolutionary advantage of faith?

Why is it that religion in some form seems to be pretty well universal in human societies? I have suggested some answers myself, and there are many other possibilities. But is it a disadvantage to lack religious conviction? Randolph Nesse seems to think it may be.

I can’t prove it, but I am pretty sure that people gain a selective advantage from believing in things they can’t prove. I am dead serious about this. People who are sometimes consumed by false beliefs do better than those who insist on evidence before they believe and act. People who are sometimes swept away by emotions do better in life than those who calculate every move. These advantages have, I believe, shaped mental capacities for intense emotion and passionate beliefs because they give a selective advantage in certain situations. …

It is harder to explain the disadvantages suffered by people who lack a capacity for faith, but consider the outcomes for those who wait for proof before acting, compared to the those who act on confident conviction. The great things in life are done by people who go ahead when it seems senseless to others. Usually they fail, but sometimes they succeed.

As one who temperamentally prefers to avoid belief systems, am I missing out on something?

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